CDC takes down warning on airborne COVID spread [Video]


The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday reversed course on its own guidance about how the coronavirus is transmitted, removing information posted on its website days earlier that said it was possible the virus could spread through airborne particles.

The CDC said the guidance – issued Friday – was posted in error and that it would provide new information shortly.

The now-withdrawn guidance recommended that people use air purifiers to reduce airborne germs and that COVID-19 could spread through airborne particles that can remain in the air and travel beyond six feet.

Up until that point, the agency’s guidance had been that the virus spreads person-to-person through respiratory droplets while talking or coughing.

The reversal comes after the Trump administration last week walked back its testing guidance for a second time.

On Friday, it updated its guidelines to urge those exposed to people with the virus to get tested even if they are not displaying symptoms.

An earlier update sparked widespread confusion among public health officials and experts when it said people who do not have symptoms may not need to get tested.

Video Transcript

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday reversed course on its own guidance about how coronavirus is transmitted, removing information posted on its website days earlier, that said it was possible the virus could spread through airborne particles. The CDC said the guidance issued Friday was posted in error and that it would provide new information shortly. The now withdrawn guidance recommended that people use air purifiers to reduce airborne germs indoors and that COVID-19 could spread through airborne particles that can remain in the air and travel beyond 6 feet. Up until that point, the agency’s guidance had been that the virus spreads person to person through respiratory droplets while talking or coughing.

The reversal comes after the Trump administration last week walked back its testing guidance for a second time. On Friday, it updated its guidelines to urge those exposed to people with the virus to get tested, even if they are not displaying symptoms. An earlier update sparked widespread confusion among public health officials and experts when it said people who do not have symptoms may not need to get tested.

Source Article