Camden County Passes 11K Coronavirus Cases, Is At ‘Moderate’ Risk


CAMDEN COUNTY, NJ — Camden County is one of 11 counties in the state that have seen a rise in some key metrics in the coronavirus crisis, according to a new report that was issued as the county surpassed 11,000 cases.

On Friday, Camden County officials announced 84 new positive cases of the coronavirus, bringing the county’s total to 11,091 cases with 559 confirmed deaths. The county had surpassed 11,000 cases on Thursday, when it had announced 53 new positive cases

The state Department of Health’s “COVID-19 Activity Level Report,” which is issued weekly, says the coronavirus activity level rose from “low” to “moderate” over the past week in Camden County. Read more here: 11 NJ Counties Backslide In Coronavirus Crisis: Here’s Where

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“This is the most cases, and the highest seven-day average of cases, we have seen since late July,” Camden County Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr. said. “As we have said all week, now is the time to reduce your possible exposures to this virus. Do not wait until we are in the midst of uncontrolled viral activity to take extra steps. We do not know if this is the start of a second wave, a larger spike, or merely a momentary increase in cases; however these sudden shifts underscore the volatility of the crisis we are navigating. Wear a mask, social distance, and do everything in your power to protect our circle, so we can get back to normal.”

Over the past week, Camden County reported 38 new cases on Wednesday, 15 on Tuesday and 26 on Monday. The county saw 57 new cases on Sunday and 54 new cases on Saturday.

Camden City has the highest number of cases in the county, with 2,883 cases and 87 confirmed deaths. Three other towns — Cherry Hill (1,510), Gloucester Township (1,119) and Pennsauken (1,004) — have exceeded 1,000 cases.

The report divides New Jersey into six regions, with Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Salem counties making up the Southwest Region. All four counties saw a rise from “low” to “moderate” risk, as did Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and Union counties.

By rising to a “moderate” level, state officials said, school districts in those counties may have to take more serious steps — such as quarantining or even shutting down schools — if a child shows the symptoms of COVID-19.

In Camden County, the Cherry Hill and Collingswood school districts opened the year in remote learning models, while Timber Creek Regional High School in Gloucester Township closed for one day this week out of an abundance of caution over four positive coronavirus tests. Read more here: Timber Creek HS In Gloucester Twp. Given OK To Reopen

The Camden County Health Department is currently working to trace close contacts of these newest cases. The investigations are still ongoing, and the county will update the public with new developments as the information is gathered by investigators.

Residents who are having difficulty coping with the coronavirus crisis can call the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, Inc. at 877-294- HELP (4357) between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. for emotional support, guidance and mental health referrals as needed. For additional information and services, call Camden County’s Office of Mental Health & Addiction at 856-374-6361.

Residents should call 9-1-1 during emergencies only, for those with questions or concerns related to the coronavirus, call the free, 24-hour public hotline at 2-1-1 or 1-800-962-1253, or text NJCOVID to 898-211.

Information regarding Camden County’s preparations, response, and general information provided to the public is available by visiting camdencounty.com. Residents can frequently check the county webpage and social media for up-to-date information.

See related: NJ Coronavirus, Reopen Updates: Here’s What You Need To Know

This article originally appeared on the Gloucester Township Patch

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