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Efforts are gearing up to enlist trusted voices in hard-hit communities of color to help ensure potential COVID-19 vaccines are tested in the minority populations most ravaged by the virus. (Sept. 18)

AP Domestic

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, experts have warned about the horrors of the 1918 flu. After the first dangerous wave of infections that spring, cities and people relaxed their efforts to contain the virus and it came roaring back in the fall and winter, killing far more people.

So far, COVID-19 hasn’t behaved the same way. There was no summer break, and we’re not seeing the ebb and flow that characterized the 1918 outbreak. It’s been more like a forest fire spiking in one area while dying down in another. 

But for months, public health officials have predicted one comparison would stand: We’d have a terrible winter.

The fear is that cases will